launch away!   random dump for space/sci-fi related materials for upcoming project(s).
The title is from Warren Ellis' Graphic Novel.

thatcriticalspaceman:

hold12:

tuzfold:

elefantnap:

spaceexp: Washing the Space Suit
are you serious, they hang the fucking things on a washing line, vladimir flatcapovich hangs up soyuz spacesuits outside on a piece of string nailed to a tree, i refuse to accept this

Yes, the Russians hangs space suits on washing line, Indians carry satellites by bicycle or cart, etc. Only Americans mystifies the whole space exploration thing so as being something special and unreachable for the average person. Even the phrase ‘it’s not rocket science’ was created by Americans. Unfortunately the Europeans tend to do the same. In every other part of the world working with space technology is treated like nothing special compared with other things.

Good old days when Americans solved some testing in this way. Can you imagine something like that today?!

Actually America also dried their space suits in a similar fashion, due to the materials used in most space suits they cannot be machine washed, so generally they will be hung out to dry in this fashion. NASA is not so mystifying or overly complicated as people make them out to be, the American public just likes to make them out to be that way. This is why the space pen legend exists.

thatcriticalspaceman:

hold12:

tuzfold:

elefantnap:

spaceexp: Washing the Space Suit

are you serious, they hang the fucking things on a washing line, vladimir flatcapovich hangs up soyuz spacesuits outside on a piece of string nailed to a tree, i refuse to accept this

Yes, the Russians hangs space suits on washing line, Indians carry satellites by bicycle or cart, etc. Only Americans mystifies the whole space exploration thing so as being something special and unreachable for the average person. Even the phrase ‘it’s not rocket science’ was created by Americans. Unfortunately the Europeans tend to do the same. In every other part of the world working with space technology is treated like nothing special compared with other things.

Good old days when Americans solved some testing in this way. Can you imagine something like that today?!

Actually America also dried their space suits in a similar fashion, due to the materials used in most space suits they cannot be machine washed, so generally they will be hung out to dry in this fashion. NASA is not so mystifying or overly complicated as people make them out to be, the American public just likes to make them out to be that way. This is why the space pen legend exists.

(via spaceexp)

— 19 minutes ago with 1270 notes

bretaa:

Okay I’m finally posting the photos from Johnson Space Center from last week. But we got to see historic mission control from the Apollo days and today’s mission control, we also went to the NBL and we went to building 9. In building 9 we not only got an Ariel perspective from the gallery but we got a tour on the floor of all the simulators by astronaut Nicole Stott from STS-133 and we got a Q&A as well! The group photo is with David Cisco, technician for the lunar modules who designed the separation of the LM. He is also an author of the book Full Circle which he signed a copy of. It was an honor to spend the day with he and Nicole their stories are phenomenal!

(via womeninspace)

— 2 days ago with 81 notes

fadmash:

ultrafacts:

For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

The oxygen in our lungs, the iron in our blood and the carbon in our body were all made by an exploding star billions of years ago. We are all made of star material.

fadmash:

ultrafacts:

For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

The oxygen in our lungs, the iron in our blood and the carbon in our body were all made by an exploding star billions of years ago. We are all made of star material.

(Source: ultrafacts, via ultrafacts)

— 2 days ago with 11663 notes

spaceexp:

370 Km by Niy Koubou

spaceexp:

370 Km by Niy Koubou

— 3 days ago with 330 notes

spaceexp:

Moment in Space LXXXIII by Tuomas Pekkarinen

spaceexp:

Moment in Space LXXXIII by Tuomas Pekkarinen

— 4 days ago with 264 notes

spaceexp:

CBS’ Coverage of the Apollo 11 Lunar Landing - Incredible if you’ve never seen it.

— 5 days ago with 108 notes

spaceexp:

Moonwalk One: This documentary gives an in-depth look at the Apollo 11 mission to the moon. NASA archival footage, as well as reactions to the mission around the world, shows the enormous impact that the moon landing had.

— 6 days ago with 41 notes

projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.

     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.

     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)

     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).

     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.

     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.

(via itsfullofstars)

— 6 days ago with 2400 notes

spaceexp:

NASA astronaut Bruce McCandless walking above space shuttle payload bay.

spaceexp:

NASA astronaut Bruce McCandless walking above space shuttle payload bay.

— 1 week ago with 197 notes

spaceexp:

Apollo 15 Command Module RCS Roll Engines

spaceexp:

Apollo 15 Command Module RCS Roll Engines

— 1 week ago with 82 notes

spaceexp:

Official portrait of Gordon Cooper while wearing the Mercury spacesuit.

spaceexp:

Official portrait of Gordon Cooper while wearing the Mercury spacesuit.

— 1 week ago with 111 notes

generalelectric:

Pictured above is the world’s largest indoor farm illuminated by LEDs, which opened this month in Japan. Inside, 18 cultivation racks reach 15 levels high, and are outfitted with 17,500 GE LED light fixtures developed specifically for this facility. The indoor farm can grow lettuce two-and-a-half times faster than an outdoor farm, and is already producing 10,000 heads of it per day. Read more about this breakthrough in modern farming at GE Reports.   

(via brucesterling)

— 1 week ago with 11427 notes

colchrishadfield:

Space Tacos - tortillas are used to replace bread on Station, and can last a year, thanks to the scientists at Taco Bell: http://www.cnet.com/news/houston-we-have-a-tortilla-problem/

Here’s what it’s like to make a sandwich in weightlessness, using one of those floating, ageless, tasty tortillas.

— 1 week ago with 642 notes

spaceexp:

David Braben explaining the galaxy map for upcoming space game ‘Elite: Dangerous’ set in a 1:1 scale Milky Way

— 1 week ago with 67 notes